Jacquemus hosts outdoor summer 2021 runway show

by MR Magazine Staff

Simon Porte Jacquemus has become known for his romantic, experiential runway shows: in previous seasons, he has presented his collections along the beach or nestled within fields of lavender. So, it was, perhaps, inevitable that he would eschew this season’s movement towards digital fashion shows.

Instead, the designer flew an audience of guests to the Vexin National Park, an idyllic natural space northwest of Paris. There, in a barley field, he had set up an outdoor show on a wooden runway.

For his spring/summer ’21 collection, Jacquemus unveiled his “L’Amour” collection. He took inspiration from Alexander Ekman’s choreography of wheat tossed passionately through the air and Emir Kusturica’s film, Time of the Gypsies with its enchanting realism.

The men’s collection stayed true to the brand’s aesthetic: roomy, airy pieces that recall classic workwear shapes. There was, though, increased representation of tailoring on offer, including wrap-fronted, unstructured blazers and oversized, slouchy trousers.

“Not long after my team was separated from each other, we were all in our homes feeling the desire to work, and a new vision of the collection emerged,” said Jacquemus in a statement. “We became a human chain, every step of the creative process executed with love. In fact, every decision I make concerning Jacquemus is motivated first by love and common sense.”

He added: “It’s why we shifted to a more sustainable rhythm last year, with two shows combining menswear and womenswear, held in January and June. This decision ended up saving us this season since we had received all our fabric orders ahead of the confinement. Deciding to go ahead with our usual collection schedule and with a show is at the heart of our visual identity, our commercial strategy. With this smaller collection, presented mainly to our family and friends, we bring our interior worlds out into the open, interpreting the humble fabrics and objects we live with that have their own poems to tell.”